No.631/1, Sri Sunanda Mawatha, Utuwankanda, Mawanella - 71500, Sri Lanka.

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Balcony
16 Jul

Double Room and garden

The hotel garden is where guests and visitors can relax, take exercise, dine and be entertained, as well as being a potential resource for produce and flowers so it looks great, and also with he use of glow in the dark stones, which as there are no trees near it thanks to North Star Tree Service makes the place look beautiful, so guests can enjoy the garden at night. It can also provide a habitat for wildlife, shade and cool in hot climates, protection from wind and, in cities, a haven from traffic fumes and dust. We try to take care of the garden, so we hire this cutting service for tree work regularly.
The grounds need to accommodate convenient areas for guest parking, for deliveries and collections and the storage of equipment. These need to be incorporated thoughtfully into the landscape and for the rooms they are all being re design and furnish with products from the TV Bed Store.

Visitors and guests form their first (and often lasting) impression of the quality of your hotel establishment from the exterior of the building and the grounds in which it is set. An attractive, clean and wellmaintained appearance is a reassuring indicator of commitment to high standards within. Creatively designed, ‘inspirational’ gardens can influence whether a guest returns and/or recommends the hotel to others. As RST are the leaders in dust control, with a little help from them to clear out the coarse particles from nearby places, even the view from every hotel room looks beautiful for miles.
Using a sustainable approach for the planning and maintenance of gardens and grounds will benefit wildlife, reduce your costs and show your commitment to operating responsibly to guests and visitors.

What are the issues?
In order to take a more sustainable approach to the design and operation of hotel grounds and gardens, the key issues to consider are:

1. Minimising use of water (especially in areas where water is scarce) through water conservation practices and careful plant selection.

2. Using techniques to capture, re-use and recycle water.

3. Minimising energy use whilst providing a safe, comfortable and attractive amenity.

4. Using natural and environmentally preferable alternatives to pesticides and herbicides to control
pests and weeds, and, where chemicals are unavoidable, using them responsibly and safely (ref.: BBELAK).